Tag Archives: John Foster

The Mystery of the Missing Guest Book

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What a wonderful concert series we’ve just had! From the stirring brass in Wagner’s Tannhäuser to the golden honeyed sound of trumpet virtuoso, John Foster, finishing with magnificent playing from the whole orchestra in Beethoven’s 7th Symphony. Our audience was full of praise and appreciation. Sadly our guest book went missing over the weekend. We’re hoping that it will find its way back to the Art Gallery, but in the meantime we’ve received this by email:

TRUMPETS WILL SOUND
Friday, 17th March 2017

The Mosman Symphony Orchestra drew a full audience to the Art Gallery last Friday evening with a program that was certain to thrill.

The ever-popular “Tannhäuser Overture” composed by Richard Wagner in 1845 proved a treat, as the orchestra captured the complex nuances of this beautiful piece that attracted so much controversy around its premier performances.

John Foster must be proud of his playing, as I was spell-bound. The Rococo “Trumpet Concerto in E-flat” by Johann Baptist Georg Neruda embraces the finest silk-like brass textures, and I wallowed in the seductive interpretation.

The Beethoven 7th Symphony brought the orchestra to life, and the audience to its feet after raising us to the heights of musical colour – so prevalant in this devilish composer. Once again controversy reigns with this work – but so what! It’s a masterpiece unfolding meaning and beauty into our vibrant world of fine Art-Music.

Well done MoSO. See you at the next concert.

Edward.

John Foster Trumpet Virtuoso

With just one more sleep till our first concert of the year, audiences at the Mosman Art Gallery should prepare to be blown away by Baroque trumpet virtuoso, John Foster who will be our soloist, performing the Neruda Trumpet Concerto.

John is one of the world’s foremost exponents of the natural trumpet. He has toured all over the world performing as soloist with leading orchestras in Europe and America. He has made several solo recordings, published 2 books, and is also much sought after as a teacher. He is the director of the Australasian Trumpet Academy, which draws artists from across the world to Australia.

John’s passion for his instrument has led him to amass a collection of over 100 trumpets from many different periods of history. There is a dedicated room in his house where he displays most of the collection in glass cases, but John says the collection has a tendency to spread all through the house.

We regularly have visitors from all over the world who come to see the trumpets’, says John, ‘much to my wife’s chagrin.’

The collection is not just for show. ‘It’s a working collection’, says John. ‘I play them all. It’s good to know that whatever the repertoire, whether it’s classical, jazz, swing, I can pick up an instrument totally appropriate to the period.’

John even has a trumpet that is named after him. He worked in collaboration with Barlow & Martin Natural Trumpets in Norwich, England, to develop the Foster Model Natural Trumpet.

When asked if he has a favourite instrument, John says ‘that’s too hard. It’s like asking if you have a favourite child.’ He goes on to say that there is a couple of Baroque trumpets of which he is particularly fond. John’s collection has been featured on the ABC television series, The Collectors and also on Channel 7’s The Morning Show.

In his Mosman concert John will be playing a modern trumpet, as Mosman Symphony Orchestra plays on modern instruments.

‘The concerto is a stunning example of late Baroque virtuosity’, says the orchestra’s musical director Andrew Del Riccio, ‘with some very innovative features for the time. What makes it even more amazing is the fact that it was written for the hunting horn. It’s a very difficult work for the modern trumpet, and only virtuosi are game to try it on.’

The concert also features music by Wagner and Beethoven’s much loved 7th Symphony.

Del Riccio advises booking online through the orchestra’s website to avoid disappointment. ‘Many of our recent concerts have sold out and this one promises to be very popular.’